A Brief Survey on Software Recommendation Tools

Software engineering recommendation systems assist developers so that they can almost automatically find: 1) code snippets that match their programs, 2) appropriate APIs and libraries, 3) bug fixes, and 4) code changes. These systems are particularly important because they can help developers to handle large amounts of information and write stable programs. In this post, we briefly categorize existing recommendation approaches and tools.

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What is topic modeling?

Topic modeling is an Information Retrieval (IR) technique that discovers representative topics from a collection of documents. Thus, we expect that logically related words will co-exist in the same document more frequently than words from different topics. For example, in a document about the space, it is more possibly to find words such as: planet, satellite, universe, galaxy, and asteroid. Whereas, in a document about the wildlife, it is more likely to find words such as: ecosystem, species, animal, and plant, landscape. But why text classification is so useful? In this blog post, we try to explain the importance of topic modeling and its use in software engineering.

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How can we evaluate modern software systems?

Most people maybe think that software engineers are only coders that develop and maintain applications, systems, and infrastructures. This is not false. But, software engineers are also responsible for the assessment and improvement of the source code itself, based on specific metrics and techniques. This post briefly discusses how software engineering can evaluate modern software systems.

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Using static analysis to evaluate Java exception handling

Static analysis is a method that one can use in order to analyze, understand, and assess the quality of a program. The main strength of static analysis is the pinpointing of coding errors without the execution of a program. In this blog post, we discuss how static analysis can contribute to the evaluation of the existing exceptions of a program and how static analysis can help in the prediction of possibly thrown exceptions by a program.

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Unchecked Exceptions

The execution of a program can suddenly terminate for several reasons. To prevent unexpected program behaviors, developers can include error handling mechanisms in their programs. Specifically, in Java, developers can use two types of exceptions: checked and unchecked. Checked exceptions (IOException, DataFormatException, ParseException, SQLExceptions, etc.) are always caught on compile time, whereas unchecked exceptions (OutOfMemoryError, ArithmeticException, NullPointerException, IllegalArgumentException, IllegalStateException, etc.) can occur on runtime and lead a program to an unexpected termination (crash)—if there is no prevention mechanism in the source code to caught the exception. However, there is a debate regarding the use of the unchecked exceptions in the source code (see Unchecked Exceptions — The Controversy, in the Java documentation).

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