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Articles Tagged: Human computer interaction (HCI)

Articles & Features

SECTION: Features

Future assistive devices

In the future, small portable devices will be available for all kinds of purposes, not least as a support for people with different kinds of impairments. But is this purely a good development or are there possible dangers? In the latter case, how can we find a proper balance?

By Lars Oestreicher, September 2019

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

"But why?" Understanding explainable artificial intelligence

Opaque algorithms get to score and choose in many areas using their own inscrutable logic. To whom are said algorithms held accountable? And what is being done to ensure explainability of these algorithms?

By Tim Miller, April 2019

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

DEPARTMENT: Blogs

A world full of emojis

The XRDS blog highlights a range of topics from conference coverage, to security and privacy, to CS theory. Selected blog posts, edited for print, are featured in every issue. Please visit xrds.acm.org/blog to read each post in its entirety. If you are interested in joining as a student blogger, please contact us.

By Maria Gaci, January 2019

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The search for my computer science

SECTION: Features

The search for my computer science

A journey spanning Nigeria, the United States, and Tanzania, is one woman's search for meaning and validation as a computer scientist.

By Judith Uchidiuno, October 2018

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Computer scientists in action: Sauvik Das, usable security & privacy

Computer scientists in action: Lining Yao, fabrication

Can we build the cyborg future we all deserve?

Knowing who we represent in HCI helps us understand what is at stake. Intersectionality can help us do better.

By Ari Schlesinger, December 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Crossroads

COLUMN: Letter from the editors

Crossroads

By Okke Schrijvers, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Incentives and Gamification

COLUMN: INIT

Incentives and Gamification

By Yannai A. Gonczarowski, Gustavo F. Tondello, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

A Brief History of Gamification

DEPARTMENT: Milestones

A Brief History of Gamification

By Alok Pandey, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Games user research and gamification in human-computer interaction

SECTION: Features: Motivating Participation

Games user research and gamification in human-computer interaction

Video games inspire new tools for creating engaging user experiences.

By Lennart E. Nacke, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Gamified and persuasive systems as behavior change agents for health and wellness

Gamified and persuasive systems as behavior change agents for health and wellness

Gameful elements and persuasive strategies can motivate and encourage people to take charge of their health and achieve their ultimate wellness goal.

By Dennis L. Kappen, Rita Orji, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The ethics of gamification

The ethics of gamification

Gamification is manipulation; at least that is what many people think. Because gamification is a powerful tool for modifying behaviors, how we should consider ethics specifically for gamification?

By Andrzej Marczewski, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

CHI 2016

DEPARTMENT: Blogs

CHI 2016

What can 1,000 scientists achieve when they invest one hour doing voluntary work?

By Nur Al-huda Hamdan, September 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

An introduction to gamification in human-computer interaction

An introduction to gamification in human-computer interaction

Improving user experience through game play.

By Gustavo Fortes Tondello, September 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The center and the periphery: beyond Eurocentrism

COLUMN: INIT

The center and the periphery: beyond Eurocentrism

By Ahmed Ansari, Raghavendra Kandala, June 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Decolonising HCI and interaction design discourse: some considerations in planning AfriCHI

SECTION: Features

Decolonising HCI and interaction design discourse: some considerations in planning AfriCHI

Bringing African theorists into the construction of African identity in HCI.

By Nicola J. Bidwell, June 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Breaking the cycle of Macondo: design and decolonial futures

Breaking the cycle of Macondo: design and decolonial futures

How can the ideas of timelessness and anachronism contribute to the decolonization of design practices in Latin America?

By Luiza Prado de O. Martins, Pedro J. S. Vieira de Oliveira, June 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Supporting creativity, expressiveness and complexity through personal fabrication

Digital fabrication: a human-machine interface for advanced manufacturing

RIT SIGCHI<br />Democratizing digitization, campus outreach, and more

Additive manufacturing

DEPARTMENT: Milestones

Additive manufacturing

By Jay Patel, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Exploring virtual reality--are we there yet?

DEPARTMENT: Blogs

Exploring virtual reality--are we there yet?

The XRDS blog highlights a range of topics from conference coverage, to security and privacy, to CS theory. Selected blog posts, edited for print, are featured in every issue. Please visit xrds.acm.org/blog to read each post in its entirety. If you are interested in joining as a student blogger, please contact us.

By Andrew J. Hunsucker, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

A manifest for digital imperfection

SECTION: Features

A manifest for digital imperfection

Artistic style is an important aspect for creative practice. However giving away some computational control over digital design and fabrication is necessary in order to engage designers in a higher-risk practice that enhances attention, creative decision making, and product ownership.

By Amit Zoran, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Personal fabrication: from automated machines to augmented tools

Personal fabrication: from automated machines to augmented tools

Fully automated digital fabrication tools are the darling of the personal fabrication movement, but they may not be the best format for harnessing digital fabrication for personal use. Instead we should be developing tools that work cooperatively with users to augment natural abilities rather than eliminate human involvement altogether.

By Ilan Moyer, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Building a toolkit for fabricating interactive objects

Building a toolkit for fabricating interactive objects

Despite the recent proliferation of easy-to-use personal fabrication devices, designing custom objects that are useful remains challenging. RFID technology can allow designers to easily embed rich and robust interaction in custom creations at low cost.

By Andrew Spielberg, Alanson Sample, Scott E. Hudson, Jennifer Mankoff, James McCann, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

3-D printing interactive objects

3-D printing interactive objects

Today's 3-D printing hobbyists churn out kilos of static trinkets. These existing machines can further help them create functional objects, if new perspectives and designs are employed.

By Valkyrie Savage, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Drowning in triangle soup: the quest for a better 3-D printing file format

Drowning in triangle soup: the quest for a better 3-D printing file format

File formats for additive manufacturing are lagging behind the capabilities of 3-D printing technology itself, and no one is doing anything about it.

By Jesse Louis-Rosenberg, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

3-D printing: green or not?

3-D printing: green or not?

3-D printing could herald new advances in sustainable production, that is, so long as it does not become a sustainability hazard itself.

By David Rejeski, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Profile: Dennis Bormann<br />The man who introduced Antarctica's Davis Station to 3-D printing

The emergence of 3-D printing

DEPARTMENT: Back

The emergence of 3-D printing

By Asmaa Rabie, April 2016

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The genie in the machines

FEATURE: Features

The genie in the machines

The ultimate goal of the Internet of Things and wearable revolution is to gift every person with their own magic genie, who will understand all of their needs and desires and thereby enrich the world around them.

By Jonathan Caras, December 2015

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Lost in the rift

SECTION: Features

Lost in the rift

Virtual reality users are torn between the real and virtual worlds. Determining how, and when, to show elements of reality in a virtual view is key to providing usable VR experiences.

By Daniel Boland, Mark McGill, November 2015

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Managing cybersickness in virtual reality

Managing cybersickness in virtual reality

If the physical side effects associated with virtual reality are not managed, the widespread adoption of VR may come to a halt.

By Lisa Rebenitsch, November 2015

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Profile: Susumu Tachi<br />The scientist who invented telexistence

The virtual human interaction lab<br />Stanford, California

DEPARTMENT: Labz

The virtual human interaction lab
Stanford, California

By Andrea Stevenson Won, November 2015

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Health 2.0: the digital health revolution

COLUMN: INIT

Health 2.0: the digital health revolution

By Diana Lynn MacLean, December 2014

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Here comes the #engagement: A serious health initiative made trendy

SECTION: Features

Here comes the #engagement: A serious health initiative made trendy

Creating a user experience to communicate the seriousness of HIV prevention and awareness can be both educational while entertaining. This combination along with a sense of cultural influence helps to both attract and engage millennials.

By Fay Cobb Payton, KaMar Galloway, December 2014

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Challenges in personal health tracking

Challenges in personal health tracking

Increasingly, personal health data can be tracked and integrated from numerous streams quickly and easily, but our feedback lingers in the land of "show the user a graph and hope." How can we help people make sense of personal health data?

By Matthew Kay, December 2014

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Satellite navigation

DEPARTMENT: Back

Satellite navigation

By Finn Kuusisto, March 2014

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Getting dressed in tech

COLUMN: INIT

Getting dressed in tech

By Terrell R. Bennett, Julia Seiter, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Quantified performance

SECTION: Features

Quantified performance

A look at how athletic performance can be measured outside of the laboratory.

By Christina Strohrmann, Gerhard Tröster, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Fitness trackers

Fitness trackers

Digital activity sensors are no longer confined to research labs; they're in the wild and they come in lime green. They offer the promise to improve our health and even to affect the ways that we interact with others.

By Andrew Miller, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Tracking how we read

Tracking how we read

Using activity recognition for cognitive tasks can provide new insights about reading and learning habits.

By Kai Kunze, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Toward smartphone assisted personal rehabilitation training

Toward smartphone assisted personal rehabilitation training

When utilizing internal sensors, modern smartphones are inexpensive and powerful wearable devices for sensor data acquisition, processing, and feedback in personal daily health applications.

By Gabriele Spina, Oliver Amft, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Capturing human motion one step at a time

Capturing human motion one step at a time

The design, construction, and deployment of a pressure-enhanced IMU system that fits in the bottom of your shoe.

By Rolf Adelsberger, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Wearable brain computer interface are we there yet?

Wearable brain computer interface are we there yet?

Brain computer interfaces are still restricted to the domains of health and research, but we understand what needs to be done and are getting closer to making a commercial wearable EEG system.

By Viswam Nathan, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Robotic vacuums

DEPARTMENT: Back

Robotic vacuums

By Finn Kuusisto, December 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Habits: Our cognitive shortcut

DEPARTMENT: Blogs

Habits: Our cognitive shortcut

Accepting the habitual system as an inseparable part of our minds, understanding its limitation and the way it works, may help us to achieve our long-term goals.

By Gidi Nave, September 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The XRDS Blog

The XRDS Blog

The newly launched XRDS blog highlights a range of topics from conference overviews to privacy and security, from HCI to cryptography. Selected blog posts, edited for print, will be featured in every issue. Please visit xrds.acm.org/blog to read each post in its entirety.

By Wolfgang Richter, Dimitris Mitropoulos, December 2012

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Seven factors for designing successful mHealth projects

SECTION: Features

Seven factors for designing successful mHealth projects

Although mobile technology has the power to vastly improve healthcare delivery in developing regions, many issues can affect the success of mHealth systems.

By Atanu Garai, December 2012

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

User experience practices in Nairobi's iHub community

User experience practices in Nairobi's iHub community

How a forthcoming user experience (UX) lab will meet the needs of the African technology community.

By Mark Kamau, Angela Crandall, Kagonya Awori, December 2012

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Research at Nairobi's iHub

Research at Nairobi's iHub

By Angela Crandall, Rhoda Omenya, December 2012

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

D-Lab-ICT: spreading ICT innovation

DEPARTMENT: Labz

D-Lab-ICT: spreading ICT innovation

By Jonathan Kola, December 2012

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Blogs

DEPARTMENT: Blogs

Blogs

By Matthew Kay, Dimitris Mitropoulos, Wolfgang Richter, Lora Oehlberg, Lea Rosen, September 2012

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Neuroscience and computing

DEMONSTRATION SESSION: INIT: issue introduction

Neuroscience and computing

By Evan M. Peck, Erin T. Solovey, September 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The sensorium

SECTION: Features

The sensorium

Research teams from around the world reflect on their brain sensing setups.

By Evan M. Peck, Erin T. Solovey, September 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Trends in BCI research

Trends in BCI research

It would be wise for stakeholders to organize and establish guidelines in order to prevent BCI from becoming a passing fad.

By Brendan Allison, September 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Subliminal computing

Subliminal computing

Can information presented below the threshold of consciousness be used to provide support to the users of interactive computer systems?

By Ryan Kelly, September 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

MRI scanners

DEPARTMENT: Back

MRI scanners

By James Stanier, September 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

In the dark, out in the cold

SECTION: Features

In the dark, out in the cold

For 30% of the population, lack of access to home-energy monitoring devices translates into a lack of power---in more ways than one.

By Tawanna Dillahunt, Jennifer Mankoff, June 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Challenges in sustainable human-home interaction

Challenges in sustainable human-home interaction

Building eco-friendly homes with occupant intelligence as the foundation.

By Johnny Rodgers, Lyn Bartram, Rob Woodbury, June 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

E-Shopping

DEPARTMENT: Back

E-Shopping

By James Stanier, March 2011

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Massive multiplayer human computation for fun, money, and survival

SECTION: Features

Massive multiplayer human computation for fun, money, and survival

Labor-on-demand---it's like cloud computing but with human workers.

By Lukas Biewald, December 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Analyzing the Amazon Mechanical Turk marketplace

Analyzing the Amazon Mechanical Turk marketplace

An associate professor at New York Universitys Stern School of Business uncovers answers about who are the employers in paid crowdsourcing, what tasks they post, and how much they pay.

By Panagiotis G. Ipeirotis, December 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Heads in the cloud

Heads in the cloud

A professor and several PhD students at MIT examine the challenges and opportunities in human computation.

By Robert C. Miller, Greg Little, Michael Bernstein, Jeffrey P. Bigham, Lydia B. Chilton, Max Goldman, John J. Horton, Rajeev Nayak, December 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

An introduction to human-guided search

An introduction to human-guided search

Can people help computers solve challenging optimization problems?

By Michael Mitzenmacher, December 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Ethics and tactics of professional crowdwork

Ethics and tactics of professional crowdwork

Paid crowd workers are not just an API call---but all too often, they are treated like one.

By M. Six Silberman, Lilly Irani, Joel Ross, December 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Running the turk

Running the turk

To find out how Amazon.com runs its marketplace for crowdsourced labor, we spoke to the vice president at the company responsible for it.

By Nelson Zhang, December 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

In search of a natural gesture

While computing has advanced exponentially, almost explosively, since the 1970s, input devices have only just begun to change. Why?

By Johnny Chung Lee, June 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Pen-based computing

Pen-based computing

Pens may seem old-fashioned, but some researchers think they are the future of interaction. Can they teach this old dog some new tricks?

By Gordon Kurtenbach, June 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Interactive surfaces and tangibles

Interactive surfaces and tangibles

Tap. Slide. Swipe. Shake. Tangible user interfaces have some scientists toying around with stuff you can really put your hands on.

By Sergi Jordà, Carles F. Julià, Daniel Gallardo, June 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Interfaces on the go

Interfaces on the go

Enabling mobile micro-interactions with physiological computing.

By Desney Tan, Dan Morris, T. Scott Saponas, June 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

From brains to bytes

From brains to bytes

Brain-computer interfaces have the potential to change the way we use devices, and there are at least four methods for implementation.

By Evan Peck, Krysta Chauncey, Audrey Girouard, Rebecca Gulotta, Francine Lalooses, Erin Treacy Solovey, Doug Weaver, Robert Jacob, June 2010

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Profile Hiroshi Ishii<br />Tangible bits

Dynamic displays

While touchscreens allow extensive programmability and have become ubiquitous in today's gadgetry, such configurations lack the tactile sensations and feedback that physical buttons provide. As a result, these devices require more attention to use than their button-enabled counterparts. Still, the displays provide the ultimate interface flexibility and thus afford a much larger design space to application developers.

By Chris Harrison, Scott Hudson, September 2009

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Introduction

By Justin Solomon, March 2009

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

HCI and theology

By Steve Clough, March 2009

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

AmazonViz

This article describes a technique to visualize query results, representing purchase orders placed on Amazon.com, along a traditional 2-D scatter plot and a space-filling spiral. We integrate 3-D objects that vary their spatial placement, color, and texture properties into a visualization algorithm. This algorithm represents important aspects of a purchase order based on experimental results from human vision, computer graphics, and psychology. The resulting visual abstractions are used by viewers to rapidly and effectively explore and analyze the underlying purchase orders data.

By Amit Prakash Sawant, Christopher G. Healey, Dongfeng Chen, Rada Chirkova, March 2009

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Modding

By Caio Camargo, March 2009

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Introduction

By Justin Solomon, December 2008

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Exploring global terrorism data

By Joonghoon Lee, December 2008

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Visualizing flow data using assorted glyphs

This project visualizes a scientific dataset containing two-dimensional flow data from a simulated supernova collapse provided by astrophysics researchers. We started our project by designing visualizations using multiple hand drawings representing the flow data without taking into consideration the implementation constraints of our designs. We implemented a few of our hand drawn designs. We used an assortment of simple geometric graphical objects, called glyphs, such as, dots, lines, arrows, and triangles to represent the flow at each sample point. We also incorporated transparency in our visualizations. We identified two important goals for our project: (1) design different types of graphical glyphs to support flexibility in their placement and in their ability to represent multidimensional data elements, and (2) build an effective visualization technique that uses glyphs to represent the two-dimensional flow field.

By Amit Prakash Sawant, Christopher G. Healey, December 2007

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

From chasing dots to reading minds

By Damien Marshall, Tomas Ward, Séamus McLoone, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Introduction

By Joshua B. Gross, December 2005

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Challenges in HCI

By Kibum Kim, December 2005

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

HCI Applications for aiding children with mental disorders

By Hossein Mobahi, Karrie G. Karahalios, December 2005

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

When news is more than what makes headlines

By Kayre Hylton, Mary Beth Rosson, John Carroll, Craig Ganoe, December 2005

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

COLUMN: Columns & reviews

Introduction

By Olivier St-Cyr, September 2002

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

FEATURE: Features

Map-based navigation in a graphical MOO

By Wendy A. Schafer, Doug A. Bowman, John M. Carroll, September 2002

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The grading system of the real world

By Lynellen D. S. Perry, June 2002

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Designing an e-commerce site for users

By Norbert J. Kubilus, September 2000

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

What's new at crossroads?

By Lynellen D. S. Perry, November 1999

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The Damocles Sword of Academic Publishing

Doctoral students often find it hard to understand at what level of productivity they should be. Through an analysis of resums of doctoral students in the Management Information Systems (MIS) field, a better understanding of what is expected of current students as compared to former students is achieved. Both conference presentations and publications in journals are examined. Finally, there is an examination of whether the quantity of publications can be related to the ranking of the school that a student attends.

By Kai Larsen, November 1998

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Explanation component of software system

Explanation is an important feature that needs to be integrated into software products. Early software that filled the horizontal software market (such as word processors) contained help systems. More specialized systems, known as expert systems, were developed to produce solutions that required specific domain knowledge of the problem being solved. The expert systems initially produced results that were consistent with the results produced by experts, but the expert systems only mimicked the rules the experts outlined. The decisions provided by expert systems include no justification, thus causing users to doubt the results reported by the system. If the user was dealing with a human expert, he could ask for a line of reasoning used to draw the conclusion. The line of reasoning provided by the human expert could then be inspected for discrepancies by another expert or verified in some other manner. Software systems need better explanations of how to use them and how they produce results. This will allow the users to take advantage of the numerous features being provided and increase their trust in the software product.

By Bruce A. Wooley, September 1998

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Road crew

By Lynellen D. S. Perry, September 1998

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Multimedia systems: introduction

By Erika Dawn Gernand, May 1998

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Everything's coming up virtual

By Susan E. Yager, October 1997

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

A human's eye view

Frameless Rendering (FR) is a rendering paradigm which performs stochastic temporal filtering by updating pixels in a random order, based on most recent available input data, and displaying them to the screen immediately [1]. This is a departure from frame-based approaches commonly experienced in interactive graphics. A typical interactive graphics session uses a single input state to compute an entire frame. This constrains the state to be known at the time the first pixel's value is computed. Frameless Rendering samples inputs many times during the interval which begins at the start of the first pixel's computation and ends with the last pixel's computation. Thus, Frameless Rendering performs temporal supersampling - it uses more samples over time. This results in an approximation to motion blur, both theoretically and perceptually.This paper explores this motion blur and its relationship to: camera open shutter time, current computer graphics motion-blur implementations, temporally anti-aliased images, and the Human Visual System's (HVS) motion smear quality (see 'quality' footnote) [2].Finally, we integrate existing research results to conjecture how Frameless Rendering can use knowledge of the Human Visual System's blurred retinal image to direct spatiotemporal sampling. In other words, we suggest importance sampling (see 'sampling' footnote) by prioritizing pixels for computation based on their importance to the visual system in discerning what is occurring in an interactive image sequence.

By Ellen J. Scher Zagier, May 1997

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Techniques & tools for using color in computer interface design

Contemporary computers predominantly employ graphical user interfaces (GUIS) and colour is a major componenet of the GUI. Every man-machine interface is composed of two major parts:the man and the machine [4]. Color interfaces are no different in that they are also based on two parts, the Human visual system (HVS) and a color display system. A theoretical examination of these two components establishes a foundation for developing practical guidelines for color interfaces. This paper will briefly examine theoretical aspects of both components and established techniques and tools for the effective use of color for software interface design.

By Peggy Wright, Diane Mosser-Wooley, Bruce Wooley, April 1997

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

User interface correctness

By Ian MacColl, David Carrington, April 1997

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Human factors in haptic interfaces

By Christopher M. Smith, April 1997

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

An investigation of current virtual reality interfaces

Virtual Reality hype is becoming a large part of everyday life. This paper explores the components of actual virtual reality systems, critiquing each in terms of human factors. The hardware and software of visual, aural, and haptic input and feedback are considered. Technical and human factor difficulties are discussed and some potential solutions are offered.

By Lynellen D. S. Perry, Christopher M. Smith, Steven Yang, April 1997

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Emotionware

By Lynellen D. S. Perry, September 1996

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Ask Jack: finding a job

By Jack Wilson, September 1996

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Digital liberties

By Lorrie Faith Cranor, May 1995

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Direct democracy

By Adam Lake, May 1995

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

net.love

By Sara M. Carlstead, May 1995

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Opinion: operating system wars

By Bradley M. Kuhn, February 1995

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Road crew

By Lorrie Faith Cranor, February 1995

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library