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Association for Computing Machinery

Magazine: Current Issue

Current Issue

From prototype to product

COLUMN: Letter from the editors

From prototype to product

By Jennifer Jacobs

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Computing profession

Quantum computation

Time management as a Ph.D.

One thousand interviews

COLUMN: Careers

One thousand interviews

How customer insights keep one company agile, and challenge these data scientist to stay ahead in an ever-changing world.

By Geerten Peek, Ahmet Taspinar

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Computing occupations, Data analytics

CHI 2016

DEPARTMENT: Blogs

CHI 2016

What can 1,000 scientists achieve when they invest one hour doing voluntary work?

By Nur Al-huda Hamdan

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Codes of ethics, Cultural characteristics, Human computer interaction (HCI), Race and ethnicity

An introduction to gamification in human-computer interaction

Quantum milestones

Quantum algorithms for machine learning

SECTION: Features

Quantum algorithms for machine learning

Quantum computing and machine learning are two technologies that have generated unparalleled amounts of hype among the scientific community and popular press. Both are mysterious, immensely powerful, and on a collision course with each other.

By Bingjie Wang

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Machine learning, Quantum computation, Quantum computation theory, Quantum computing

Many-body quantum mechanics

Many-body quantum mechanics

Special purpose quantum computers---realized with current technology---have the potential to revolutionize physics, chemistry, and materials science.

By Michael L. Wall, Arghavan Safavi-Naini, Martin Gärttner

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Quantum computation, Quantum computing

Black holes, quantum mechanics, and the limits of polynomial-time computability

Black holes, quantum mechanics, and the limits of polynomial-time computability

Which computational problems can be solved in polynomial-time and which cannot? Though seemingly technical, this question has wide-ranging implications and brings us to the heart of both theoretical computer science and modern physics.

By Stephen P. Jordan

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Quantum computation, Quantum computing, Quantum mechanic simulation

Reliable quantum circuits have defects

Reliable quantum circuits have defects

The first large-scale practical quantum computer is within reach. Coming to grips with the strategy and challenges of preparing reliable executions of an arbitrary quantum computation is not difficult. In fact, defects are good.

By Alexandru Paler, Austin G. Fowler, Robert Wille

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Logic circuits, Quantum error correction and fault tolerance, Quantum technologies

Establishing quantum advantage

Establishing quantum advantage

What are quantum computers good for? This essay reviews the progress toward proving a quantum advantage over classical computing.

By Adam Bouland

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Quantum complexity theory, Quantum technologies

Programming quantum computers using 3-D puzzles, coffee cups, and doughnuts

Programming quantum computers using 3-D puzzles, coffee cups, and doughnuts

Programming a quantum computer is a task as baffling as quantum mechanics itself. But it now looks like a simple 3-D puzzle may hold the solution.

By Simon J. Devitt

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Quantum error correction and fault tolerance, Topology analysis and generation

Black holes and the limits of quantum information processing

Black holes and the limits of quantum information processing

The densest memories and the fastest processors imaginable on computers located billions of light-years away

By Brian Swingle

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Physics, Quantum computation theory

Undecidability of the spectral gap

Undecidability of the spectral gap

What happens to undecidability in the quantum computing paradigm?

By Johannes Bausch

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: History of computing theory, Quantum computation theory

David Deutsch

UC Berkeley's quantum computing group<br />Berkeley, CA

The RSA trap

The infinite mixtures of food products