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Association for Computing Machinery

Magazine: Winter 2013 | Volume 20, No. 2

Forget about blenders

COLUMN: Letter from the editors

Forget about blenders

By Peter Kinnaird, Inbal Talgam-Cohen

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Computing occupations, Document types

Inbox

DEPARTMENT: Inbox

Inbox

By XRDS Staff

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: General and reference

Getting dressed in tech

Student chapters in Europe

How you can change the world

Maintaining ACM traditions<br />Professional development done right

The Google technical interview<br />How to get your dream job

Security bugs in large software ecosystems

DEPARTMENT: Blogs

Security bugs in large software ecosystems

The XRDS blog highlights a range of topics from security and privacy to neuroscience. Selected blog posts, edited for print, will be featured in every issue. Please visit xrds.acm.org/blog to read each post in its entirety. Keeping with our theme of professional development, included is a guest post on how to craft a publishable research paper.

By Dimitris Mitropoulos

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Computer crime, Operating systems security, Security and privacy

The scary reality of identity theft

The many stages of writing a paper, and how to close the deal

Quantified performance

SECTION: Features

Quantified performance

A look at how athletic performance can be measured outside of the laboratory.

By Christina Strohrmann, Gerhard Tröster

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Health informatics, Human computer interaction (HCI), Personal computers and PC applications

Fitness trackers

Fitness trackers

Digital activity sensors are no longer confined to research labs; they're in the wild and they come in lime green. They offer the promise to improve our health and even to affect the ways that we interact with others.

By Andrew Miller

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Health informatics, Human computer interaction (HCI), Personal computers and PC applications, Social and professional topics

Tracking how we read

Tracking how we read

Using activity recognition for cognitive tasks can provide new insights about reading and learning habits.

By Kai Kunze

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Communication hardware, interfaces and storage, Human computer interaction (HCI), Machine learning

Toward smartphone assisted personal rehabilitation training

Toward smartphone assisted personal rehabilitation training

When utilizing internal sensors, modern smartphones are inexpensive and powerful wearable devices for sensor data acquisition, processing, and feedback in personal daily health applications.

By Gabriele Spina, Oliver Amft

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Health informatics, Human computer interaction (HCI), Personal computers and PC applications

Capturing human motion one step at a time

Capturing human motion one step at a time

The design, construction, and deployment of a pressure-enhanced IMU system that fits in the bottom of your shoe.

By Rolf Adelsberger

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Health informatics, Human computer interaction (HCI), Signal processing systems

mHealth @ UAH

mHealth @ UAH

New health care systems that integrate wearable sensors, personal devices, and servers promise to fundamentally change the way health care services are delivered and used.

By Mladen Milosevic, Aleksandar Milenkovic, Emil Jovanov

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Embedded and cyber-physical systems, Health care information systems, Health informatics, Real-time systems

Airwriting

Airwriting

It may be possible to enable text entry by writing freely in the air, using only the hand as a stylus.

By Christoph Amma, Tanja Schultz

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Interaction devices, Motion capture, Motion processing, Touch screens, User centered design

Wearable brain computer interface are we there yet?

Wearable brain computer interface are we there yet?

Brain computer interfaces are still restricted to the domains of health and research, but we understand what needs to be done and are getting closer to making a commercial wearable EEG system.

By Viswam Nathan

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Human computer interaction (HCI)

Profile Ori Inbar<br />Making augmented reality a reality

Cryptography, security and privacy (CrySP) research group

Robotic vacuums