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Articles Tagged: Massively multiplayer online games

Articles & Features

Games user research and gamification in human-computer interaction

SECTION: Features: Motivating Participation

Games user research and gamification in human-computer interaction

Video games inspire new tools for creating engaging user experiences.

By Lennart E. Nacke, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The ethics of gamification

The ethics of gamification

Gamification is manipulation; at least that is what many people think. Because gamification is a powerful tool for modifying behaviors, how we should consider ethics specifically for gamification?

By Andrzej Marczewski, September 2017

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Our virtual reality revolution

COLUMN: INIT

Our virtual reality revolution

By Pedro Lopes, November 2015

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Creativity in code

SECTION: Features

Creativity in code

Mediums such as fine art and poetry are common subjects in computational creativity---but what about something closer to home? Can computers be as creative in programming as they are in poetry?

By Michael Cook, June 2013

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Introduction

By Justin Solomon, March 2009

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Modding

By Caio Camargo, March 2009

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Introduction

By Neel Vadoothker, December 2007

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Trends in real-time rendering

Fans of PC role-playing games need no introduction to Bioware-the Edmonton, Alberta based developer of Baldur's Gate, Neverwinter Nights, and Jade Empire, among others. The company recently opened a studio in Austin, Texas to develop a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG, or simply MMO) for an unannounced intellectual property. Ben Earhart, client technology lead on the new project, took a few hours out of his busy schedule to discuss with Crossroads the future of real-time rendering-3-D graphics that render fast enough to respond to user input, such as those required for video games.

By James Stewart, December 2007

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The student's guide to GDC

By James Stewart, December 2007

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Introduction

By Paula M. Bach, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

At a crossroads

By Paula Bach, Chris Jordon, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The digital divide

By Scott Dyer, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Interesting complexity

By Caio Camargo, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

A lifetime in gaming

By Audrey Christophory, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

AI and the rise of gaming middleware

By Audrey Christophory, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The Sims 2

By Chris Dondanville, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Modding

By Caio Camargo, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

From chasing dots to reading minds

By Damien Marshall, Tomas Ward, Séamus McLoone, December 2006

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Virtual communities and team formation

By Yanru Zhang, Michael Weiss, September 2003

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Networking

By Kostas Pentikousis, June 2003

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Game-state fidelity across distributed interactive games

By Aaron McCoy, Declan Delaney, Tomas Ward, June 2003

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Faster 3D game graphics by not drawing what is not seen

The increasing demands of 3D game realism - in terms of both scene complexity and speed of animation - are placing excessive strain on the current low-level, computationally expensive graphics drawing operations. Despite these routines being highly optimized, specialized, and often being implemented in assembly language or even in hardware, the ever-increasing number of drawing requests for a single frame of animation causes even these systems to become overloaded, degrading the overall performance. To offset these demands and dramatically reduce the load on the graphics subsystem, we present a system that quickly and efficiently finds a large portion of the game world that is not visible to the viewer for each frame of animation, and simply prevents it from being sent to the graphics system. We build this searching mechanism for unseen parts from common and easily implemented graphics algorithms.

By Kenneth E. Hoff, May 1997

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The story of XPilot

By Bjorn Stabell, Ken Ronny Schouten, November 1996

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

The video game [R]evolution

By Sarah Elizabeth Burcham, November 1996

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Computer game marketing bias

By Melissa Chaika, November 1996

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Book Reviews: game programming

By Lynellen D. S. Perry, November 1996

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Software review: Doom 2

By Terry White, December 1994

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library

Software review: tie fighter

By Terry White, September 1994

PDF | HTML | In the Digital Library