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Association for Computing Machinery

Magazine: Current Issue

Current Issue

Digital me, my smart devices and I

A statement of solidarity

Is computing toxic?

On the path to great progress

Demystifying national labs

Lifelong learning

Beware of toxic computing

Designing technology that promotes users' digital wellbeing

SECTION: Features

Designing technology that promotes users' digital wellbeing

Existing tools for digital self-control strongly rely on users' self-regulation strategies and capabilities. Recent work, however, highlights the importance of proactively assisting users in learning how to use technology through customizable and adaptable interventions.

By Alberto Monge Roffarello, Luigi De Russis

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Human computer interaction (HCI), Human-centered computing, Smartphones

Using sensors to measure inbox stress

OPEN ACCESS

Using sensors to measure inbox stress

Email notifications are constantly calling for our attention, and the volume of emails is ever-increasing. A research group at the University of California, Irvine explores how managing the inbox affects stress for different working populations.

By Fatema Akbar

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Email, Human computer interaction (HCI)

Sleep, health, productivity, and the double-edged sword of technology

Sleep, health, productivity, and the double-edged sword of technology

While technology has traditionally impaired sleep, it also has the potential to enable and reframe sleep as a productivity and health booster.

By Stephen M. Mattingly

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Human-centered computing

Current practices in mental health sensing

Current practices in mental health sensing

The ubiquity of smartphones and wearables makes it an attractive option to passively study human behavior. We explore the current practices of using passive sensing devices to assess mental health and wellbeing, including the limitations and future directions.

By Subigya Nepal, Weichen Wang, Bishal Sharma, Prabesh Paudel

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Consumer health, Ubiquitous and mobile computing

Critical thinking of mobile sensing for health

Critical thinking of mobile sensing for health

What you need to consider before collecting, processing, and analyzing mobile data for health applications.

By Afsaneh Doryab

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Data analytics, Life and medical sciences, Ubiquitous and mobile computing

The role of online communities in supporting mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

The role of online communities in supporting mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major effect on billions of lives, with online communities playing an active part in supporting people's mental health.

By Chengcheng Qu, Renwen Zhang

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Life and medical sciences, Social media

Integrating people-centered and planet-centered design

Integrating people-centered and planet-centered design

Exploring the many approaches and issues involved in developing technologies for wellbeing---from including environmental concerns to building long-lasting, transdisciplinary partnerships both inside and beyond the academy.

By Xuhai Xu

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Collaborative and social computing, Computing education programs, Health informatics, Human-centered computing, Sustainability

Toward a more empathic relationship between humans and computing systems

Toward a more empathic relationship between humans and computing systems

How might computing support us in becoming our better, more emotionally resilient selves? We explore this in an interview with the team from Microsoft Research's Human Understanding and Empathy group.

By Xuhai Xu, Karan Ahuja, Jasmine Lu, Mary Czerwinski, Jina Suh, Gonzalo Ramos

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Artificial intelligence, Consumer health, Human computer interaction (HCI)

Assessing the mental health of college students by leveraging social media data

Assessing the mental health of college students by leveraging social media data

The mental health of college students is a growing concern and gauging the mental health needs of this group is difficult to assess in real-time and in scale. The ubiquity and widespread use of social media, particularly among young adults, provides opportunities for various stakeholders to proactively assess the mental health of college students and provide timely and tailored support.

By Koustuv Saha, Munmun De Choudhury

HTML | In the Digital Library
Tags: Empirical studies in collaborative and social computing, Human-centered computing, Psychology

Integrating technology into health

Toxicity caused by computing

Get to know Arduino

Toxic computing